Rabbit-Brush (p’u7tn’álhp)

Common Rabbit-Brush is a small shrub that grows in dry grasslands and open forests throughout the Fraser, Thompson, and Okanagan basins. It is commonly found growing alongside sage and can be distinguished by its yellow flowers and bushier looking stems.

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Description
Latin Name Chrysothamnus nauseosus
Type Shrub
Description Common Rabbit-Brush is a small shrub that grows in dry grasslands and open forests throughout the Fraser, Thompson, and Okanagan basins. It is commonly found growing alongside sage and can be distinguished by its yellow flowers and bushier looking stems.
Height and Spread  Up to 1 m tall.  1-2 m in spread.
Bloom Colour Small yellow flowers growing densely at branch tips.
Bloom Months Late summer
Foliage Colour Grey greenish
Seed Months Produces hairy seeds in late summer after flowering.
Light and Water Enjoys strong sunlight. Grows in dry, hot conditions. Needs very little water once established.
Ethnobotany Information Rabbit-Brush has a long history of ethnobotanical uses. The St’at’imc people drank an infusion from the leaves to cure sore throats, while other indigenous peoples used the tea to ease cramps after childbirth. The branches were also used for smoking animal hides.
Wildlife Uses Rabbit-Brush is an important food source for many creatures, most notably being heavily browsed by deer and mountain sheep.
Garden Uses Rabbit-Brush is particularly useful for creating a xeriscaped garden that requires very little water. Its bright yellow flowers contrast beautifully with the grey/green leaves.
Facts The genus name Chrysothamnus means ‘golden-crowned,’ referring to the dense golden-yellow flowers at the branch tips.
Propagation Techniques Rabbit-Brush is propagated by seed, generally planted in the fall with new plants growing in the spring. The germination rate is fairly low, but due to the high seed output of each plant it is easily spread.