Interior Douglas Fir (srep7ùl)

Tall tree with broad-sloping pyramid shape. Bottom branches hang downwards and upper branches point up. Smooth, grey-brown bark with resin blisters. Flat needs whorl around the stem and are smooth to touch.

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Description
Latin Name Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca
Type Tree
Description Tall tree with broad-sloping pyramid shape. Bottom branches hang downwards and upper branches point up. Smooth, grey-brown bark with resin blisters. Flat needs whorl around the stem and are smooth to touch.
Height and Spread 18 – 22 m (60 – 70 ft.) 9 – 10 m (30 – 35 ft.)
Bloom Colour None – but cones ripen in fall. Cones hang downwards and drop to the ground. The cones have unmistakable 3-pronged bracts between the cone scales.
Bloom Months
Foliage Colour Blue-green
Seed Months September – October
Light and Water Full sun or partial shade Water a few times in hot dry conditions
Ethnobotany Information This tree was revered for its many uses in food, medicine, and spiritual rituals. The wood is excellent for making fishing poles and hoops for fishing nets. Seeds were eaten, and a decoction from the bark was used as a laxative. The needles are rich in vitamin C, which is best absorbed as a tea.
Wildlife Uses Deer eat the fresh tips that fall from the tree crowns, and rely on the mature forest for cover. Bears strip the bark of young trees to eat the cambium layer. The seeds support large populations of small mammals and birds.
Garden Uses Douglas-fir can be used as a shade tree or can be sheared into large hedges. It is a good bird attractant.
Facts The main diet of mule deer in the winter is Douglas-fir tips. When the wind blows through interlocking branches, the tender tips are knocked off and land on the forest floor where the deer pick them up. Douglas-fir is our fastest growing conifer, and can live for over 700 years.
Propagation Techniques